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Ep. #140: Emma Hanley, gallerist at Jack Hanley Gallery on the Lower East Side (her father's gallery)
Explicit
May 21, 2016 12:04 PM PDT

http://theconversationpod.com/
Please subscribe to The Conversation on iTunes, and leave a positive review: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/conversation-artist-podcast/id481461646

New York gallerist Emma Hanley, associate director at her father Jack Hanley's Lower East Side gallery, talks about:

Growing up in the Bay Area with two artist parents, and a collector grandmother, and her experiences hanging around and eventually doing small jobs at her dad's gallery in the Mission district of San Francisco; her stints working at Sotheby's and, more recently, Christie's, where she worked up until switching to her post at Jack Hanley Gallery, where she's been a little over a year; how a comment from Jerry Saltz led her to start working for her dad; the challenges of working with artists, including when they get approached by big New York galleries (when the gallery was based in San Francisco); how being a middle child is serving her well in being able to handle artist personalities, and to remain unemotional in their various moments of stress and freaking out, by taking herself out of the equation; how often what the artist is freaking out about is the fact that they need to address any unresolved issues with their work on their own, a reality they typically don't want to face head on, hence the acting out; and how, thanks to having had a lot of strong personality types in her family, she gets along well with both artists and collectors, perfect qualifications for her job.

The Conversation on Stitcher (the alternative to iTunes):
http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/wwwstitchercompodcasttheconversation/the-conversation-art-podcast?refid=stpr

The Conversation on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Conversation-An-Artist-Podcast/254884424579431

http://instagram.com/artistpodcast

Twitter: @artistpodcast

Your support of the podcast is very much appreciated- donations can be made via the website, and help keep the show going.

Ep. #139: Amanda Yates Garcia- L.A.-based artist and witch
Explicit
May 15, 2016 03:04 PM PDT

http://theconversationpod.com/
Please subscribe to The Conversation on iTunes, and leave a positive review: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/conversation-artist-podcast/id481461646

Los Angeles-based artist and witch (yes, you read that right) Amanda Yates Garcia, along with co-host Deb Klowden Mann, talks about:
Her great craftsman home in the West Adams neighborhood, and how she got in before the gentrification race that's going on now; how she answers the question of what she does by saying that she's a witch, and the ensuing conversation around that, including being a provocateur even when she doesn't feel like being one; artists and witches through the ages, and how the meaning of being a witch can be as diverse as the meanings of being an artist; how a big part of being a witch, for her, is examining authority- who gets to make the rules; how to invoke your spirit figure, whether it's a name that's been invoked many times, from your own culture ideally, or more one of your own created entity; how magic, not unlike art, is not about belief, believing in magic, or believing in art; how she was raised in a Wiccan household with a feminist mother, but who also had a lot of patriarchal ideas; the failings of patriarchy today, and what happened in her "Devouring Patriarchy - Healing the Wounds of the Father" workshop; how, in addition to representing for witches, she's also representing for 'healing,' a maligned word in the context of contemporary art, but she doesn't give a f*ck—it's desperately needed in our world now (that and love); her performance "Capitalism Exorcism;" the subtle distinctions between objects used in performance/ceremony as ritual objects, and becoming art objects; how she is able to sustain herself as a witch, but not an artist; how she's no longer attached to the idea of being known as 'an artist,' an identity that she (and many) was especially attached to out of grad school; and she offers a magical financial tip, having to do with getting (buying) the thing that you yourself are selling.

The Conversation on Stitcher (the alternative to iTunes):
http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/wwwstitchercompodcasttheconversation/the-conversation-art-podcast?refid=stpr

The Conversation on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Conversation-An-Artist-Podcast/254884424579431

http://instagram.com/artistpodcast

Twitter: @artistpodcast

Your support of the podcast is very much appreciated- donations can be made via the website, and help keep the show going.

Ep. #138: Ben Davis of ArtNet News and 9.5 Theses on Art and Class--gets real about the art world artist's futures
Explicit
May 08, 2016 12:55 PM PDT

http://theconversationpod.com/
Please subscribe to The Conversation on iTunes, and leave a positive review: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/conversation-artist-podcast/id481461646

Ben Davis, National Critic for ArtNet News and author of 9.5 Theses on Art and Class, talks about:
His time in Australia at the (x) conference, and his meetings with artist Ben Quilty (also a social activist work); art and activism, and art & politics; the mutually incompatible art tribes that exist among the different 'art worlds;' how the fact that all the different complaints from various factions of the art world(s) can all be true at once, and how disorienting that can be (for Ben); how outside of the cities where there's a market, the conversation is almost always about social aesthetics (what Ben calls "social practice") instead, and how that's where government arts support tends to gravitate; how some of the most interesting art – art that's 'underground and weird' - is being made outside of the art world bubble, among them Fee Plumley, an artist based in Adelaide; sections from his book "9.5 Theses on Art and Class" -- the title and also a specific chapter of his book which was originally written as a pamphlet and intervention of an art show in NY on art and class – including trickle-down theories of both economics and art; and art education, and particularly what for Ben was a profoundly moving article: A Eulogy for Hope: The Silent Murder of Gallery 37 ; what explains the fact that grad schools are made up of 2/3 women, but galleries represent 1/3 women…what happened in between?; what the mechanisms are that make up the art world/how it works; his piece "Do you have to be rich to make it as an artist?"; how the conversation about the art market is a complete dead end; how cities with much smaller art markets, but much cheaper housing, are better for artists; and how without the writing, without the intellectual circulation around the production of art, art's just an overpriced piece of decoration.

The Conversation on Stitcher (the alternative to iTunes):
http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/wwwstitchercompodcasttheconversation/the-conversation-art-podcast?refid=stpr

The Conversation on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Conversation-An-Artist-Podcast/254884424579431

http://instagram.com/artistpodcast

Twitter: @artistpodcast

Your support of the podcast is very much appreciated- donations can be made via the website, and help keep the show going.

Ep. #137: Anthony Greaney, groundbreaking Boston gallerist
Explicit
April 29, 2016 10:36 PM PDT

http://theconversationpod.com/
Please subscribe to The Conversation on iTunes, and leave a positive review: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/conversation-artist-podcast/id481461646

Boston gallerist Anthony Greaney talks about:
His commute to Boston from outside the city proper; his day job at Harvard, where he designs exhibitions for their museums of science and culture (Harvard Museum of Natural History, Harvard Semitic Museum, Peabody Museum); working for various dealers in New York as preparation for running his own gallery, of which he talks about its various challenges, especially out of Boston, with NY in such close proximity; some of the first artists he showed, who are now L.A. artists (and why he thinks L.A. is a better art city than New York); why it made sense to him to return to Boston after cutting his teeth at various New York galleries, what with the exorbitant costs of starting up a gallery in NY, and how being in Boston gave him the opportunity to do what he wanted to do, as opposed to what he had to do; the struggles of keeping a gallery running logistically, and why he kept his day job while running it; how it's no longer the case anymore that you have to 'fake it till you make it,' and that new, young galleries that are succeeding are doing it as part-time endeavors.

The Conversation on Stitcher (the alternative to iTunes):
http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/wwwstitchercompodcasttheconversation/the-conversation-art-podcast?refid=stpr

The Conversation on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Conversation-An-Artist-Podcast/254884424579431

http://instagram.com/artistpodcast

Twitter: @artistpodcast

Your support of the podcast is very much appreciated- donations can be made via the website, and help keep the show going.

Ep. #136: Brooklyn-based painter Shara Hughes: studio hopping across the east coast, and 'dating' galleries for representation
Clean
April 24, 2016 10:52 AM PDT

http://theconversationpod.com/
Please subscribe to The Conversation on iTunes, and leave a positive review: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/conversation-artist-podcast/id481461646

Brooklyn-based painter Shara Hughes talks about:
Being from Atlanta, and living between there, New York, and various cities where she did residencies; evolving as a New York artist while spending time in Atlanta, Denmark, and various residencies around the U.S.; having a hard time adjusting to living in New York initially, how she felt lonely and out of sorts finding friends beyond just colleagues, despite her career going well; the different levels of success of her various artist residency friends living in New York – some of whom were doing much better than she was, and others who essentially disappeared from view; how last year (in April, 2015), after American Contemporary Gallery closed, she became "single" (without gallery representation) for the first time since 2004, when Rivington Arms picked her up, and that there are actually opportunities in becoming "single" again; how she's in the midst of "dating" several prospects, but that it's a stressful process, partially because it's difficult to know where to go to get good advice and deal with getting too many unwanted opinions; and her various day jobs, including working in the bakery at a Whole Foods…which she hated.

The Conversation on Stitcher (the alternative to iTunes):
http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/wwwstitchercompodcasttheconversation/the-conversation-art-podcast?refid=stpr

The Conversation on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Conversation-An-Artist-Podcast/254884424579431

http://instagram.com/artistpodcast

Twitter: @artistpodcast

Your support of the podcast is very much appreciated- donations can be made via the website, and help keep the show going.

Ep.#135: Max Maslansky on mining porn for painting, navigating a big career leap, and art world wisdom
Explicit
April 15, 2016 10:53 PM PDT

http://theconversationpod.com/
Please subscribe to The Conversation on iTunes, and leave a positive review: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/conversation-artist-podcast/id481461646

Los Angeles-based painter Max Maslansky, along with co-host Deb Klowden Mann, talks about:
His Kchung radio show Riffin', and his most memorable guest on the show (Jake Longstreth, with whom he debated about The Eagles); how he started the current iteration of his porn-based work, back in 2010, when he began collecting old photographs and storing them on Facebook, in both 'public' and 'private' collections, then selecting particular images to paint onto bedsheets; how porn, even in the art world, still has a taboo association to it, and how the porn Maslansky uses is quaint compared to what's out there now, and his point that dopamine levels are higher in porn consumption now supports that, because people need stronger fixes than ever; his experience getting curated into the Hammer Museum's Made In L.A. 2014; how being practical led him to keep his job working at Richard Telles gallery after this success, though he went from full-time to part-time; what he's learned about artists and the art world from working at the gallery, a gig he's had much longer than he thought he would; and how artists who become big successes may or may not maintain them, and that a significant part of their rise is beyond their control.

The Conversation on Stitcher (the alternative to iTunes):
http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/wwwstitchercompodcasttheconversation/the-conversation-art-podcast?refid=stpr

The Conversation on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Conversation-An-Artist-Podcast/254884424579431

http://instagram.com/artistpodcast

Twitter: @artistpodcast

Your support of the podcast is very much appreciated- donations can be made via the website, and help keep the show going.

Ep.#134: Jacques Louis Vidal, artist & residency director of Fisher's Island's The Lighthouse Works
Explicit
April 07, 2016 08:43 PM PDT

http://theconversationpod.com/
Please subscribe to The Conversation on iTunes, and leave a positive review: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/conversation-artist-podcast/id481461646

Fisher's Island-based artist Jacques Louis Vidal talks about:
Living on Fisher's Island, off the coast of Long Island and Connecticut, where he is the resident director for Lighthouse Works, an artist's residence; what his life is like there, between taking care of the residents (mainly cooking them upscale meals) and making his art in a studio off site; his co-running the gallery Know More Games in Carroll Gardens, Brooklyn, and its heady days circa 2011/2012, shortly after which he left the gallery for his residency gig; his creative project corresponding and making art & language with a friend from middle school who he learned is incarcerated on death row, someone who he used to do graffiti and get into trouble with; his side life committing petty crimes, which continued into adulthood; his problems with authority, both in general and in the art world; the alternative school he went to during high school, for kids who get in trouble a lot- where his therapist told him that he was capable of dealing with darker things than other people…which eventually allowed him to in turn convert his darkness into his art; and how, as a landlord for the gallerists of 247365, he lowered their rent with the agreement that they would give him a show with them, happening in Nov. 2016; and a great story from one of his residency directing stints that demonstrates how such a severe lack of distraction impacts the subtextual levels of interpersonal relations.

The Conversation on Stitcher (the alternative to iTunes):
http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/wwwstitchercompodcasttheconversation/the-conversation-art-podcast?refid=stpr

The Conversation on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Conversation-An-Artist-Podcast/254884424579431

http://instagram.com/artistpodcast

Twitter: @artistpodcast

Your support of the podcast is very much appreciated- donations can be made via the website, and help keep the show going.

#133: Brooklyn-based painter and art writer Stephen Westfall advocates for painting
Explicit
April 02, 2016 11:47 AM PDT

The Conversation's website: http://theconversationpod.com/

Please subscribe to The Conversation on iTunes, and leave a positive review: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/conversation-artist-podcast/id481461646

Brooklyn-based painter Stephen Westfall talks about:

Living in Brooklyn (Red Hook), where the rent on his loft will soon be going up 18%, and how he's considering living elsewhere in the city, or possibly New Jersey (since he teaches at Rutgers); the crazy real estate market, via shell properties and so on, yet how their might be a tiny glimmer of hope; how his best year of sales, in 2011/12, allowed him the opportunity to purchase a cottage upstate, but since his income has dropped since then his margins are on the tight side (which is noteworthy considering something as basic as getting rid of a dying tree on that property could be a serious expense); his coming of age in San Francisco as an anxiety filled youth, and his subsequent emergence as an artist via UC Santa Barbara's College of Creative Studies, where he began as a literary major; and we launch into a spirited debate about abstraction, including Stephen riffing on the ambiguity between figuration and abstraction; the 'Big Bang' of painting, starting with representation and eventually leading to, after five centuries, being about painting itself, and abstraction as the next 'Big Bang'; that there's "abstract painting because there are more things to paint abstractly," also known as 'shark's teeth,' in which "the more things you have, the more spaces you have between things"; the willingness to have a suspension of belief, and how, unique to painting, it is both an imagined space and a thing at the same time; and how he didn't go to openings for 10 years after a painful breakup with a fellow artist, and how, in turn, he learned that legends in the art world can be created just by not going out to openings for a while.

The Conversation on Stitcher (the alternative to iTunes):
http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/wwwstitchercompodcasttheconversation/the-conversation-art-podcast?refid=stpr

The Conversation on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Conversation-An-Artist-Podcast/254884424579431

http://instagram.com/artistpodcast

Twitter: @artistpodcast

Your support of the podcast is very much appreciated- donations can be made via the website, and help keep the show going.

Ep. #132: Thomas Micchelli of Hyperallergic on the nuances of art reviewing
Explicit
March 25, 2016 10:03 PM PDT

Artist and Hyperallergic writer and editor Thomas Micchelli talks about:

His working class roots in New Jersey; how his busy life (full-time job, making his art, seeing shows, writing and editing for Hyperallergic Weekend) keeps him from time-consuming ‘social’ conversations; how the most gratifying feedback he gets on his writing is when an artist says that he’s “got” their work; how he doesn’t see himself as someone who makes judgments in his reviews but rather as someone who explores his personal reaction; how Jeff Koons’ retrospective at the Whitney showed a total concession to the market, and why; other topics include the artist Judith Bernstein and her late-in-life re-emergence as an artist of consequence in NY after decades in the wilderness treated like a pariah; the late, legendary Italian filmmaker, artist and poet Pier Paolo Pasolini – a gay communist atheist at a time when being gay in Italy was illegal – who made one of the darkest films ever: Salo, or 120 Days of Sodom; the most memorable review he’s written (also his hardest to write); the fact that he’s most drawn to abstraction as a viewer (because it comes down to his interest in formal issues, and abstraction lays them out in very stark terms), despite being a figurative painter himself; and how growing up working class led him to making figurative art as opposed to abstraction.

The Conversation's website: http://theconversationpod.com/

Please subscribe to The Conversation on iTunes, and leave a positive review: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/conversation-artist-podcast/id481461646

The Conversation on Stitcher (the alternative to iTunes):
http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/wwwstitchercompodcasttheconversation/the-conversation-art-podcast?refid=stpr

The Conversation on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Conversation-An-Artist-Podcast/254884424579431

http://instagram.com/artistpodcast

Twitter: @artistpodcast

Your support of the podcast is very much appreciated- donations can be made via the website, and help keep the show going.

Ep. #131: L.A.-based artist Sarah Cain
Explicit
March 18, 2016 10:00 PM PDT

Los Angeles-based painter and sculptor Sarah Cain talks about:

living in Highland Park, and the trials and tribulations she went through in buying a house (with a studio) there; moving to France as a foreign exchange student at 15, with only a year of French under her belt; going to grad school at UC Berkeley, as opposed to the Cooper Union-to-Yale dual track that she thought was the ticket at the time; being a woman who goes after what she wants, and, as a woman in the art world who's been accused of being too forthright with certain museum curators; her ambition, and how that's informed her career, including getting out of her Upstate New York hometown; the lack of discovery and experimentation in some art; her reputation while in San Francisco and how it's changed since moving to L.A. in 2007; the many routes to success in the art world, whether through the work and NOT being an immense socialite, or the 'fake it till you make it' approach; her relationship to class, having come from a lower-middle class background, to now frequently being in the company of the 1%; how she works in the studio vs. how she works onsite when doing over-the-top installations; and what she thinks about abstraction in its different forms, including her thoughts on having made it when it was very unpopular, vs. now when it's become so popular.

The Conversation's website: http://theconversationpod.com/

Please subscribe to The Conversation on iTunes, and leave a positive review: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/conversation-artist-podcast/id481461646

The Conversation on Stitcher (the alternative to iTunes):
http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/wwwstitchercompodcasttheconversation/the-conversation-art-podcast?refid=stpr

The Conversation on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Conversation-An-Artist-Podcast/254884424579431

http://instagram.com/artistpodcast

Twitter: @artistpodcast

Your support of the podcast is very much appreciated- donations can be made via the website, and help keep the show going.

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